About Me

After a hurricane, the sea comes to our house.

When it rains, it pours.

The sun is finally shining again!

These are pictures of my backyard, the top one after a hurricane, the middle one after a long rain and the lower one on a sunny day.

I am a freelance technical translator who specializes mostly in patents and articles from technical and medical journals. I have translated thousands of patents, mostly from Japanese and German, but also from French, Russian, Czech and Slovak, and a few from Polish to English. I am based in Virginia, near the the Atlantic Ocean and the North Carolina border.

I have been writing articles about translation for various publications in US for translators such as the Translorial (Northern California Translators Association), and The Gotham Translator (New York City Translators) in the nineties, as well as for the ATA Chronicle (American Translators Association) more recently. Over the years I also wrote a number of articles for Gabe Bokor’s Translation Journal.

I started writing this blog in February of 2010. The purpose of this blog is to keep people who are interested in translation and related topics entertained by my posts and hopefully have some fun while doing that.

I also have a business website at www.patenttranslators.com.

Responses

  1. How on earth did you learn all of these languages?! I am half fluent in German and starting to learn Polish, but it’s really a doozy.

    Kudos to you. Also, I’m a patent attorney at a big firm. Feel free to send along your brochure/sales pitch. We hire translations firms a couple of times a year, and it usually costs a fortune and results are somewhat questionable.

    Like

    • Dear Charles Lee,
      I am krishna from India. An experienced EnglishKannada (a south Indian language) translator.

      For any such opportunities please refer me.
      Hv a nice day

      Like

  2. I just figured out when I was about 16 that I am pretty good at languages and I went for it.

    Feel free to send me a document for a price quote for translation.

    I don’t have brochures, but I do have a website:

    http://www.patenttranslators.com

    Like

  3. [...] About Me [...]

    Like

  4. That’s “back garden”. A yard, be it back or front, is a large paved, tarmacced or otherwise compacted area. And anyway, it’s your own fault for not moving house.

    Like

  5. It’s called a backyard here in Virginia, Anon.

    Like

  6. That’s a jungle, not a backyard!

    Like

    • That’s a park, not a jungle!

      Like

  7. Thanks for having this blog. I hope to be a regular reader.

    Like

  8. So do I.

    Like

  9. Great blog.. but where do you find the time…

    Like

  10. Where do you find the time to comment …..

    Like

    • Commenting is easy after delivering a patent…Incidentally, I am going through all of your archives. Your blog on synchronicity was particularly interesting since I have noticed the phenomenon around me.

      Like

      • My post about synchronicity has very few views.

        People are not very interested in the subject.

        Translator’s dementia, on the other hand, has more than 7 thousand views now and it is less than a month old. Somehow I gave the online community of bored translators a global laughing fit and I can’t figure out how I did it.

        Like

  11. [...] About Me [...]

    Like

  12. luckily enough, you don’t claim to be a patent translator leader …
    ;-)))

    Like

  13. Hello. I just found your blog recently and am enjoying it. I am a patent translator as well. It’s been almost 9yrs since I got into this industry (9yrs is probably nothing compared to the other pro translators), and recently I get sick of this job. I’m so grateful for what I’m capable of and the fact that I have this job, because it was not easy at all for me to become a patent translator, but recently I feel like I’ve been in my first “slump.” Do you ever get bored with your job? Do you go through ups and downs? If so, what do you do to refresh your mind? I wonder if translating so many languages wouldn’t make you bored much? Any advice would be appreciated.

    Like

  14. “Do you ever get bored with your job? Do you go through ups and downs? If so, what do you do to refresh your mind?”

    The answer is 1. yes, 2. yes, all the time.

    What I do to refresh what is left of my mind?

    I take a nap, or take the dog for a walk, write a post for my blog, read a novel …. a number of things.

    I would probably stop translating altogether if I did not need money or if I could figure out how to do something else that would pay more.

    But translating is pretty much the only thing that I can do to get paid for it.

    Or maybe putting a Paypal icon on my blog would help? ….. uh, probably not.

    Like

  15. Have you ever considered to become an interpreter?
    By the way, my name is Alice, I am one of your silent readers (your posts are always interesting, but sometimes great fun, too!).

    Like

    • I tried interpreting when I was starting out in early eighties, but I don’t have the nerves for it.

      I prefer translating.

      Like

  16. Dear Patenttranslator (I’m sorry I didn’t want to call you by your first name, but you don’t seem to appreciate this when you don’t actually know the people, I didn’t want you to get annoyed)

    I’m also a silent reader of your blog, but primarily because english isn’t my mother-tongue and I’d probably need hours before I get to order my thoughts the way I’d do in french. I like my statements being accurate and truly reflecting my thoughts. But I can’t. So I read your posts with delight but I don’t write at all.

    Anyway, as a translator myself, I have to deal with “Google Translation is the future” matters almost everyday. You made it clear that this is also one the themes which can make you very busy thinking about. So I GOD had to think about you today when I discovered this video on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nu-nlQqFCKg&feature=player_embedded
    Scoble, presenting the new Microsoft Speech Recognition Breakthrough Whatever…

    For now, I’m perplex and since I’ve also got some experience with software developing (i.e. = I’m a big geek in informatics :)), too many questions are floating in my head. Obviously that thing was received as THE sensation of the century, among non-language professionals at least (I’m much more critical about that but wouldn’t be most of translators that?). For now I’m having too many technical questions about the “backstage” of that tool, so I’d be very interested to hear your opinion on the matter.

    Thank you for reading my awful prose and have a nice day! :)

    Like

    • Sorry I’m really tired at the end of the week. That is not Scoble presenting of course, but Rick Rashid. I had just read something about Scoble and was obviously sticking to this as I send my first comment. Sorry for that.

      Like

      • “sent”, not “send”, of course. So sorry… But now you see why I rather don’t comment at all. ;)

        Like

  17. Hi,

    I came across your blog since I’ve started learning Japanese and I think you would be interested in the Japanese language program we’re launching at lexikeet.com. I want to ask what you would think of trying it out with a free account as a reviewer for your blog. We think we’d be a great fit for you and your readers who are learning Japanese with our methodology of short, focused study sessions along with our features for vocabulary and handwriting. If you’re interested let me know and take care!

    Like

  18. I think you’ll love this: I couldn’t resist and copied it from the website of an agency that offered me work (probably for peanuts – I didn’t try replying to them after seeing this):
    “How to Cut Your Translation Cost by 60% or More without Sacrificing Quality
    Cutting your translation cost by 60% is cool. If you save $1000, the profit of your company increases $1000 accordingly. It’s definitely possible to cut your translation cost by 60%. Many of our clients have cut their translation cost by 50%, 60% or even more by using our services. This is how you can save the same.

    Important: You can save on translation only if you choose a service level right for your needs.

    Choosing xxxx
    . We charge 10 to 30% less than other translation companies for the same level of service.
    Simply choosing the right service level for your translation can even save you up to 50%.*
    Using our FREE translation memory may save you up to 70% or more.*
    * Depending on the nature of contents
    Pay no rush fees. We will not charge you for a rush fee even for a turnaround within 20 hours.
    Pay no minimum fees. We accept orders starting from $1. This means you don’t have to pay any minimum fees.
    Use discounts. We offer volume discounts and a new client discount for your first order.”

    Especially interesting the bit about translations for $1!!

    Like

  19. @Chaya

    So what is the name of these Miracle Workers, I wonder?

    Like

  20. http://www.translia.com/user/register – do you want to work for them?

    Like

  21. @Chaya

    I don’t want to work for them and I would not want them to work for me either.

    Like

  22. Your short post about Trados and so much comments on it have really entertained me. I like the post.

    Like


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,306 other followers

%d bloggers like this: