Posted by: Steve Vitek | April 6, 2012

Translator’s Dementia (TD) – What It Is and How To Recognize the Signs

Translator’s dementia (TD, dementia translatoris) is a relatively recent neurodegenerative disorder, believed to be caused by the environment in which freelance translators are forced to live, and by the conditions under which they have to perform various tasks required in their solitary occupation.

A typical freelance translator works in a “home office”, which is usually located in a hot and dusty attic, in a converted garage, or in a cold, damp and dark basement because s/he cannot really afford a sunny room with a view on blue ocean in a gorgeous house, which does not help things much. True, some translators have one or several additional rooms in their apartment or house, but those are usually occupied by family members who obviously need a healthier living environment than a mere translator. However, partly as a result of their stressful occupation, many if not most translators have no family, which again does not help things much.

There are really only two types of work that translators can expect and need to get used to in their line of work: 1. rush work, or 2. no work. For rush work, some clients are willing to pay a rush rate which is about a cent or two higher than the usual rate, but not too many. But in return, translators are expected to produce around 10 thousand words per day if they even dare to be so greedy and disrespectful as to ask for a surcharge of 1 cent per word. During the periods when there is no work, which can last for weeks or months on end, translators have no income at all, which is why they feel that next time they will have to take on again rush translations necessitating the approximate output of around 10 thousand words per day for rush translations at their usual low, low rate.

Are you a translator who is suffering from TD?  Do you even know which signs to look for in translators who are suffering from this modern disease which often remains undiagnosed?

Some of the signs and symptoms of TD are listed below.

1.         Compulsive E-Mail Checking Disorder

This obsession is frequently aggravated during the “famine periods” when translators have no work. The translator often develops an obsession for checking e-mail every few minutes, although all s/he needs to do is check e-mail every few hours at the most.

However, translators suffering from TD feel that it is very important to diligently delete each spam message from their e-mail as soon as a new junk e-mail arrives, which is about every 2 minutes, because it could be a job. Some translators keep checking their e-mail for no reason even when they are working on an extremely tight deadline. This means that their TD is already in its more progressed form.

2.         Compulsive-Obsessive Blogging Disorder

During the early stages of this disorder, which is another symptom of TD, translators usually only leave angry and incoherent messages on the blogs of other translators, often in several languages. Trivial differences of opinion, for instance on the proper use of a gerund instead of an infinitive, or the difference between “that” and “which”, can drive translators literally insane.

During the later stage of TD, the translator usually launches his or her own “flaming” blog so that s/he could expose the corrupt and depraved practices prevalent in the translation industry. Once a TD sufferer has his or her own blog, s/he feels the need to check compulsively the blog view count every few minutes. If there is no work available and nobody seems to be interested in the TD sufferer’s blog either, the translator inevitably succumbs to long bouts of depression, which can be cured only by the next onslaught of rush translations with extremely brutal deadlines.

3.        Translator’s Agora Phobia Panic Disorder

Agora phobia means in Old Greek “fear of open spaces”. In particular when translators have no work and nobody is reading their stupid blogs either, they are reluctant to leave their damp basement office or hot and dusty attic office where they are still able to experience a measure of safety in what is also known in professional literature as “translator’s protective cocoon”.

Although most translators are equipped these days with a cell phone and they could easily transfer their office line to their cell phone and keep compulsively checking the junk e-mails on the same cell phone while for example checking out the produce at the Farmers Market, or browsing in bookstores, they refuse to do that. The truth is, they feel that there is a purple sign on their forehead, which says “I am a total loser”, and since everybody would be able to read that purple sign, they shun open spaces where other people could be present and prefer to stay in the darkness of their “safe cave”.

4.         The I-Need-To-Lower-My-Rates Symptom

Translators who are chronic TD sufferers often come to the conclusion expressed in the title of the symptom above once they realize that they are indeed total losers who are not worthy of even the few cents that people used to be willing to pay them for their translations. Since they also have to compete with free machine translation, the threshold for lowering the cost is pretty low in the case of freelance translators. Needless to say, this does not help things much either.

Translators who are obsessed with the thought that they need to lower their rates sometime ask for advice on blogs of other translators, but they believe that other translators are actively conspiring against them if they are advised to stick to their guns and demand a rate that actually enables economical survival.

5.         The I-Need-To-Find-A-Safe-Job Syndrome

During the last stage of TD, some translators, usually the younger ones, create new résumés and start looking for another job. For most translators, this is an impossibility because, let’s face it, most translators are able to do only one thing, namely translate, and some of them not very well. But there are a few among them who do have some other marketable skills, and if they can in fact find another job in this economy, any job at all, they can sometime snap out of their dementia once they realize that it’s a big world out there, baby, and you can try doing other things.

But most of them have no other discernible marketable skills, and thus they have no choice but to keep doing what they have been doing for the last decade, or two, or three, or more.

Unfortunately, there is really no help for these poor people, although some of the symptoms can be alleviated with the techniques described in this post. There are also drugs that one can take to control TD, but this only means that the disease is temporarily suppressed, and that it is only waiting to rear its ugly head again when the effects of the anti-TD medications have worn off.

About these ads

Responses

  1. Haha! Thanks a lot! You made my day! Or actually a week, during which I have been finishing work at 3-4 a.m., for 5 days in a row. Of course, checking my e-mail every 3 minutes, not going out and wondering whether I should get a “normal” job. Oh, and that’s my first comment on a translation blog ever… Good night and happy holidays! It’s time to finally go to sleep.

    Like

    • Happy holidays?

      What holidays?

      Translators have no holidays.See Ricky’s comment.

      Like

      • Ha,ha…I never said we do have holidays. It’s just that they happen to be in the calendar ;)

        Like

  2. Holidays?! Holidays??!! Holidays???!!! Translators have holidays? (It used to help to drink beer while translating….)

    You mean other people don’t worry about the downside of French having no preterite? Or about how to explain the similarities of and differences between “…we often used to…” and “…we would often…” and “…we did that often…”?

    Wait a second while I get my Lorazapam.

    Like

  3. Ha, brilliant! Thanks for giving me a smile on a grey Saturday morning!

    Like

  4. I like this piece of your writing, Mr. Vitek, and the closing bracket of a clip of “Laurie Forman wants Michael Kelso (SO BAD)” is a nice choice.

    How would you like Alla’s “Песенка про меня” for the opening bracket? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cAndqTGg5J4) You wrote that your video brackets do not bear relations to your writings, but they do for me. So, Alla’s song would be telling the lot of a TD suffering freelance translator.

    Thanks for this hilarious piece!

    Like

  5. Thank you very much, I’ll think about it.

    Like

  6. Now that I have stopped laughing, I can bring myself to post a comment. You have certainly further brightened an already bright, sunny, windy but mild, fall Saturday morning, seen from my extra-bedroom-turned-into-an-office, where I had to draw the blinds closed against the glare of the sun (maybe I better stop the description here, lest somebody suffers an envystroke, LOL). I don’t think that Nr. 5 will ever be your case, but if it were, you could certainly explore the possibilities of becoming a (a) psychologist – or shrink, for the uninitiated -, or (b) a stand-up comedian (there is a Seinfeldesque twist to your lines…). As for myself, although I don’t really suffer from agoraphobia, I have at times – after being closeted in front of the screen for hours on end to meet a deadline – felt that the street noise/traffic/people sort of crash down on me and I hurry back to the safety of my lonely sunny office….dropping everything on my way to the screen to check the mail – wait, I think that I may have contracted the TD disease….:=).
    Have a nice Easter weekend (notice that I refrain from using the word “holidays”).

    Like

  7. You are right, the solution suggested in No. 5 is no longer an option for me since I have been working as a translator for about 30 years now and I don’t really know how to do anything else.

    But some younger people out there working as translators who read my blog can perhaps recognize the symptoms of the disease and find a real job for themselves while there’s still time to do that.

    Like

    • Yes, several (young) colleagues of mine have actually gone into teaching languages, because they could not make ends meet doing translations, while others have succumbed and work for agencies on the basis of a fixed salary (read: overworked and underpaid). Myself, I went the inverted route: For thirty-something years I actually did something else (while secretly yearning to become a professional translator) which involved translation but this was not my profession; so after retirement I went back to school, got my degree, and am doing what I like to do most. Now, in the downtimes I try not to brood overmuch and enjoy life, toiling my heart out when there are deadlines to meet, and this works out just fine for me.

      Like

  8. [...] Translator’s Dementia (TD) – What It Is and How To Recognize the Signs « Patenttranslator's Blo… There are really only two types of work that translators can expect and need to get used to in their line of work: 1. rush work, or 2. no work. For rush work, some clients are willing to pay a rush rate which is about a cent or two higher than the usual rate, but not too many. But in return, translators are expected to produce around 10 thousand words per day if they even dare to be so greedy and disrespectful as to ask for a surcharge of 1 cent per word. During the periods when there is no work, which can last for weeks or months on end, translators have no income at all, which is why they feel that next time they will have to take on again rush translations necessitating the approximate output of around 10 thousand words per day for rush translations at their usual low, low rate. [...]

    Like

  9. Agoraphobia actually means ‘fear of market places’, i.e. translators have no time to go to the farmers’ market to buy decent food.
    And while I’m being pedantic, sorry, I mean a stickler for accuracy, it should be ‘there are A few among them who do have some other marketable skills’. The A makes all the difference to the meaning.
    Thanks for a good laugh during a weekend when ‘normal’ people aren’t working.

    Like

    • 1. Agora actually means “a gathering place”, not a market place. It was the “open space” or “gathering place” where the farmers market was held in ancient Athens (the apostrophe after “farmers” is not really used much here, note that the official name of the ATA is American Translators Association).

      2. Thank you for finding the typo. Please feel free to let me know about any and all typos in my blog posts as long as you are willing to do that for free.

      3. It is 5:57 AM here and I am already checking my blog views and compulsively deleting junk e-mail.

      Like

      • On the apostrophe –
        “note that the official name of the ATA is American Translators Association”: note that in contrast it’s the Irish Translators’ and Interpreters’ Association / Cumann Aistritheoirí agus Teangairí na hÉirean. Is this a cultural difference between the US and the old continent, or is one more correct than the other? Lynne Truss, in her delightful “Eats Shoots & Leaves – The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation” and “The Girl’s Like Spaghetti: Why you Can’t Manage Without Apostrophes” would back the Irish.

        In the UK, ITI sidestepped the problem by calling itself the Institute of Translation and Interpreting – although the main reason was that it should promote the quality of the work we do, rather than being a kind of trade union for us workers.

        But compulsive-obsessive apostrophe disorder is one sign of Translator’s Dementia, so I’d better shut up and get back to the translation I agreed to do over the Easter weekend without daring to ask for a rush rate….

        Like

  10. Me again: note that I am in the UK so am working at 10.23 am, not 5.23 am!!!!!!

    Like

  11. Thanks for a good laugh. No-one but another translator could possibly understand the feast and famine, peaks and troughs of a translator’s existence. I’ve worked as a freelancer for the past 25 years but the profession has changed and I refuse to spend hundreds of pounds on translation software. I’m a translator, not a technician. Over the years I’ve written a few novels and have now found a new source of income by putting nine of them on Kindle. When that bubble bursts I’ll spend more time on my hobby of oil painting. Have a great Easter at work or leisure.
    By Nora Fountain

    Like

  12. I don’t use CATs either, see my post Friends Don’t Let Friends Use Trados, etc.

    I am not sure what you mean by “when the bubble bursts”.

    The way I see it, there are smaller and bigger bubbles which keep bursting all the time while new ones are being formed.

    Like

    • Hear, hear! (regarding the use of expensive software and CATs). Myself, I use Wordfast (and absolutely refuse going into the cash-depleting, agency-induced,Trados frenzy) but only in a very sui generis (or rather “my-generis”…) way, i.e., for my own control. I have never used it vis-à-vis clients and refuse to give in to the percentage game (exact matches, fuzzies, the lot) which is yet another ploy to deprive translators of a fair rate.

      Like

  13. Contrary to popular belief, I found out from the reaction to a couple of posts about Trados here that there is a relatively large percentage of translators who don’t use computer memory tools at all because just like me, they don’t need them, and moreover consider translation an art that is not really suitable for the software-based, mechanical approach.

    I also see from my dashboard that just about every week there is at least one translator who finds my blog after Googling “I hate Trados” or something along these lines. Lot of translators seem to hate Trados and I can see why.

    I also agree that translation agencies are eager to work with translators who use Trados because that makes it easy for them to cheat translators on the word count based on “fuzzies” and the like and pay them even less than what they used to be paid a few years ago.

    Since I have never had a direct client ask me whether I use Trados or another computer memory tools, I think that Trados is used mostly by translators who are used to being paid rock-bottom prices and who are OK with that.

    Like

    • Right you are. Translation is an art, a craft, a profession. It requires to be savvy and in-the-know of a lot of things, and mostly, to have a certain “knack” that makes you stand out among your peers. CATs are just tools, and as such, on occasion they may come in handy. The main advantage I find in using Wordfast, for instance, is that it segments the text, and in long legal texts, this has the saving grace of preventing me from “jumping” lines or paragraphs. Plus the integrated glossaries, which save much-needed search-time, and that you can make up as you go, and the possibility of conducting contextual searches on certain topics. But I repeat, this I use internally, for my own benefit exclusively. I have never worked on the basis of a client-supplied memory or provided mine to a client. Just the other day, a client provided an already translated document to use as reference, and this was, not only in need of improvement, but also contained spelling mistakes (not typos). So, what kind of a reference could that be? Sometimes, from one translation to the other, I don’t even agree with myself! :=)

      Like

      • Indeed, TM is just a tool, in the same way as a dictionary is and nobody would refuse to use them!
        I’ve used DV for about 8 years and wouldn’t be without it. Wish I’d bought it earlier. I do not give discounts and don’t tell my clients I use DV unless they ask.

        Like

      • Exactly, Patricia. That’s my own position.

        Like

  14. Oh. My. Gosh. Am there, doing that… :-(

    Like

  15. [...] כתבה שאתם חייבים לקרוא: שיטיון מתרגמים, מתי זה קורה ואיך מזהים את הסימנים. מסתבר שהעבודה שלנו מלחיצה מאוד, ויוצרות אצלנו תסמונות [...]
    ..] Article you must read: Dementia translators, when this happens and how to recognize the signs. It turns out that our work is very stressful and we create syndromes [...] [Translated by Google Translate from Hebrew]

    Like

  16. But it is an insoluble/insolvable dilemma:
    if I don´t check frequently, I feel like I am careless;
    if I check frequently, I feel like I am paranoid. :-(

    Like

    • Err, don’t you mean ‘I feel as if I …..’?

      Like

  17. Ooh enlightening! It all makes so much sense to me now. Everything that’s happened in my life just got answered. Why things are the way they are, why I behave the way I do. I can’t believe I have gone this long without knowing. It feels good to be finally diagnosed. Where do I get pills for that? ;-))))

    Seriously though, I think a better name for the affliction would be ‘translatoritis’.

    (PS. hilarious!! :-)

    Like

  18. “Where do I get pills for that?”

    Bayer, GlaxoSmithKline, and Pfizer are still working on the new pill, which will be on the market as soon as they find a suitable name and figure out how to market it to persons suffering from this particular form of dementia and how to price it.

    It will probably cost only about 200 dollars for a supply of the medication that should last most sufferers a whole month.

    Like

  19. http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Translators-Dementia-TD-What-It-138763.S.107473478?qid=e0b786c0-b5fe-495c-9b86-f0e5b33c4817&goback=.gmp_138763

    Like

  20. It’s so spot on it isn’t funny. I had an attack of get-me-any-job just today.

    Like

  21. Wonderfui article about translators’ mental disorder. I’m a Spanish translator living in Madrid, specialized in psychology and psychiatry. I like your article so much that I’d like to resquest your permisson to translate it into Spanish for publication in Panace@, which is a Spanish journal on medical translation. Of course, I would add your name as the author and the name of the blog the article comes from, and I shall send you the journal to you upon publication so that you can see your article translated into Spanish. Do you feel this would be a good idea?. I am looking forward to hearing about your opinion. Please, write to me as soon as possible (the journal will be issued soon) to: jmtraductorma@yahoo.es My name is Juan Manuel Martin.

    Thank you in advance for your kind attenton.

    Juan Manuel

    Like

    • Hi Juan:

      You have my permission as long as I don’t have to pay you for the translation.

      Steve Vitek

      Like

      • Thanks a lot, No, of ocurse, you don´t have to pay anything. Congratulations: your are really gifted. Now, I became one of your fondest followers. I will send you the journal as soon as it is released (in June, I think). So, I need your e-mail address (it’s an electronic journal. I’ll send you the link to access for free). OK?
        Best regards
        Juan Manuel (from Madrid)

        Like

  22. My e-mail address is in the “About” tab on this blog, here is the link to it:
    http://patenttranslator.wordpress.com/about/

    Hope you like the pictures of my backyard.

    Like

  23. Hi, thank you for a very funny and insightful article. I must admit that, even though I am currently in that golden valley between no jobs and rush jobs, I still sometimes check my spam folder (somewhat compulsively) to see if some job offer hasn’t ended up between ads for growth pills and get rich scams.

    While reading, I remembered another little symptom of TD from the drought periods – the let’s-learn-Chinese-and-get-rich syndrome. Because if I learn Chinese, which should take about a day or two, I’ll be able to translate for a market which is growing up to be the world leader (or already has) and I’ll earn a pretty penny. A pretty penny I tell you!! :)

    Well, after a short time I would usually sober up from these delusions and remind myself to check the spam folder again and wishfully dream of the day when all that spam becomes real work…. With time, my wishes came true, but some of those little symptoms still persist :)

    Like

  24. I started learning Chinese in 1976.

    I gave up after a few weeks.

    99.99 percent of people who start learning the language will give up eventually.

    Like

  25. This is absolutely one of the funniest blogs on translators I’ve ever read. Especially liked the number of things that “really don’t help much” and our two types of work… could NOT stop laughing. Thanks so much! It is so refreshing to laugh once in a while, even if it’s by yourself and in front of a computer that has 10 different word documents open at the same time :)

    Like

  26. Thank you.

    You made my day.

    This post was read 1,354 times so far today and the day is still young.

    I am not used to these kinds of numbers.

    Like

    • I would start getting used to them if I were you… you are truly a superb writer. Maybe that’s something else you could do besides translating ;) (as per one of the solutions you offered).

      Like

  27. hehheh… how many symptoms constitute fullblown TD? I have 3 and a half out of 5… ‘s that a positive?

    Like

    • I’m afraid yours is full-blown already.

      Like

      • that’ll look good on my CV :D

        Like

  28. So sorry.

    Like

  29. OMG, I have just realized how lucky I am to have a beautiful French-style office in the city, where I mainly receive my clients, accountant, do some paperwork, and translate and I travel abroad to interpret in conferences. I have never experienced what you said in your post, and I hope I’ll never will. Sorry, but even if it’s meant as a joke, the post really sounds dark and depressing. All the best!!

    Like

    • It was not meant as a joke!

      Why do people think that I am joking around when I am describing a serious ailment while my heart goes out to poor TD sufferers?

      You are so lucky that you don’t seem to have any symptoms … yet.

      Like

    • I hope for your sake that the requirement to leave the safety of your office will become less and less frequent with time.

      My heart goes out to people who have to fly some place to do their job, while all I have to do is fit in a little bit of work here and there while I am furiously blogging in my pajamas.

      Like

  30. Actually, I’m translating from a spacious room in Phuket with a gorgeous ocean view. Translating, that is, when my girlfriend doesn’t want me in bed urgently, or we don’t go swimming in the surf. TD? I don’t has it!

    Like

    • Then you should be OK.

      Good for you!

      Just make sure that you have some sort of tsunami warning system there that you can hear even when your girlfriend wants you in bed urgently.

      I happen to know that Asian women tend to be noisy lovers.

      Like

  31. Check this out y’all if you’re not very busy with a rush-rush-quick-quick job:

    Like

  32. Who runs this blog? How many times do I have to unsubscribe to stop getting e-mails every time someone else adds a (very repetitive) comment?

    Like

  33. WordPress.

    Like

  34. [...] a recent post on this blog titled “Translator’s Dementia (TD) – What It is and How To Recognize the Signs”, I briefly described this dreadful neurodegenerative disorder, which is relatively common among [...]

    Like

  35. Have been translating for 45 years (plus a long career in journalism). Thanks for describing my life. Could’ve been hilarious if it weren’t so sad.

    Like

  36. Could’ve been sad if it weren’t so hilarious.

    Like

  37. I never read [other] translators’ blogs [like this one].

    Like

    • That’s because I am not really blogging about translation.

      Instead, I am opening wide the window to my tortured, demented soul under the pretext of writing about translation.

      Like

  38. Thank you, Steve, for this great blog! I found myself mainly in the first and the last point…I keep checking my emails even when I do not have to…and I could talk about rush translations for hours…fortunately I already have a family, but the stress accompanying translations is just so unbearable that I am considering of really doing something else. I have been working with Trados since 2007 and last year an agency forced to buy the newest version at a discount because they would not send me translation jobs in the future. After 4 translations they stopped sending me jobs…I have just realized how stupid a man can be and especially a translator. Giving up everything just to earn some money to feed yourself and your family (only partly of course). If I look back, I can think of every night and holiday I spent working just to be able to send my translations in on time….this is simply silly and so discreditable. Just because I am a freelance translator I can be treated as a robot or a computer or what??? I think that after 5 years I have to reconsider my job as a freelance translator. Fortunately I have developped some other skills too, so I will try to find another job…Thanks a lot once more and have a nice day!

    Like

  39. That sounds really bleak, Katarina. That sounds like a Slovak name, but it could be another language too.

    I wonder, what other skills you have?

    I can only translate, so another job is out of the question for me.

    My only other skill is writing silly blog posts. This one had already close to 8 thousand views … if I could only figure out how to make money with this skill!

    Like

    • Well, I have tried tourist guiding in Slovakia (yes, I am Slovak) and I like it however it is also a demanding and sometimes really exhausting job, but you do not have to spend a lot of time behind the PC, you are always travelling somewhere and also hiking in the mountains. Sometimes I am fed up with translating some 8-12 even 14 hours and not doing anything else….my back hurts, I have some problems with my eyes and though I love languages I feel like I need some time off doing something else and to speak foreign languages (i. e. English and French) because I think that I need to change the solitude and isolation that surrounds me as a freelance translator…I have some projects for the summer regarding tourist guiding. We will see, but I am looking forward to taking some weeks off and to experiencing something else than just silly translating with the use of Trados…

      Like

  40. Every week people who Google something like “I hate Trados” end up on my blog because I wrote a post about it. It is 2 years old but it still gets a lot of views.

    I personally don’t use any CATs.

    Like

  41. I just happened to see this blog post via a comment on Corinne McKay’s blog. Hillarious and brilliant! It’s also kind of eerie to discover one’s own behavioral patterns here. So, hopefully some of the bif pharmaceutical corporations will find a cure for TD.
    Regards
    TD (incidentally, those are my initials…should I be worried?)

    Like

  42. [...] with staying at home too much. A great post over at Patenttranslator’s Blog – “Translator’s Dementia (TD) – What it is and How to recognize the Signs” includes a lovely description of the typical “home office” . Jill Sommer, on [...]

    Like

  43. Hilarious, thanks for the laughs! :-)

    Like

  44. [...] on patenttranslator.wordpress.com Share this:Like this:LikeBe the first to like this [...]

    Like

  45. By the way, there is no need to leave the security of my tiny office for food. Groceries can be purchased mail order, Even though I live across the street from a grocery store and going to the store is often my only contact with real humans face to face, I discovered mailorder groceries one winter when I was chained to my computer and couldn’t find my snow boots (which also can be bought mailorder, by the way). Even fresh produce can be obtained mailorder if you get enough rush jobs to afford the next-day shipping, and I have been tempted many times but purchased a sprouter and seeds instead (by mailorder, of course). If not for picking up snailmail (and packages of groceries etc.) and setting the trash out on trash day, I would never have to go out the door. Actually, I can get the mail carrier to stuff the snailmail through the cat door. Unfortunately, most packages won’t fit. So I still have to go out on the front porch, and even all the way to the back on trash pickup day. I could probably get someone else to do those chores, though, if I just explain that my TD prevents me from doing it myself.

    Like

  46. [...] You will inevitably find out that posts that you considered absolutely brilliant masterpieces, such as this one or this one, were total flops, while silly nonsense that you were writing while after a shot of whisky before going to sleep have been received with much aplomb and admiration worldwide (such as the post about Dementia Translatoris). [...]

    Like

  47. Very interesting and very funny!!!!!!!! Where should I get the pills for this disease???????? Jajajaja

    Like

  48. Try Your Canadian Pharmacy on the Internet, they also sell little blue pills called Viagra, all made in China.

    Like

  49. [...] für mich gefunden, im Reinen mit mir und der Übersetzerwelt zu sein. Und nachdem ich den Artikel Translator’s Dementia (TD) – What It Is and How To Recognize the Signs gelesen habe, fiel es mir wieder auf. Dieses Syndrom befällt viele in Zeiten geringer [...]

    Like

  50. [...] 4.         Employees can enjoy the company of other people who work for the same company. Freelancers are really quite isolated, which is a factor contributing to translator’s dementia described in this blog. [...]

    Like

  51. [...] moves me to do so was my “uncanny” (in the words of one commenter) article “Translator’s Dementia, What It Is And How To Recognize the Signs“. This post, which is about 5 months old, has been translated into several languages, it [...]

    Like

  52. [...] Translator’s dementia (TD) is a relatively recent neurodegenerative disorder, believed to be caused by the environment in which freelance translators are forced to live, and by the conditions…  [...]

    Like

  53. [...] Since I started writing this post, 2 new resumes from Zombie Translators appeared in my mailbox. (I check my e-mail frequently because like most translators, I suffer from the compulsive e-mail checking disorder). [...]

    Like

  54. [...] Translator’s dementia (TD) is a relatively recent neurodegenerative disorder, believed to be caused by the environment in which freelance translators are forced to live, and by the conditions…  [...]

    Like

  55. [...] Translator’s dementia (TD) is a relatively recent neurodegenerative disorder, believed to be caused by the environment in which freelance translators are forced to live, and by the conditions…  [...]

    Like

  56. [...] it went over 4,000 views in January 2012, then in April 2012 it jumped to 14,181 because I wrote this silly parody on a newly disicovered disease, and now the number of views dropped back to between 5,000 and 6,000 a [...]

    Like

  57. [...] Translator’s dementia (TD, dementia translatoris) is a relatively recent neurodegenerative disorder, believed to be caused by the environment in which freelance translators are forced to live…  [...]

    Like

  58. [...] Stupendo!   "During the early stages of this disorder, which is another symptom of TD, translators usually only leave angry and incoherent messages on the blogs of other translators, often in several languages. Trivial differences of opinion, for instance on the proper use of a gerund instead of an infinitive, or the difference between “that” and “which”, can drive translators literally insane."  [...]

    Like

  59. [...] for quite a while. The most successful post that I have written in terms of eyeball exposure was “Translation Dementia (TD) – What It Is and How to Recognize the Signs”. I wrote it in April of this year and as of now it had about 10,500 views. When it was new, 2,423 [...]

    Like

  60. [...] Translator’s dementia (TD, dementia translatoris) is a relatively recent neurodegenerative disorder, believed to be caused by the environment in which freelance translators are forced to live…  [...]

    Like

  61. [...] who are interested in arcane topics involving highly abstract translation concepts (topics like Translator’s Dementia, the distinction between Subprime Translators and Zombie Translators, and of course how much [...]

    Like

  62. [...] average as far as my posts go, although it lags far behind some of my best posts so far, such as Translator’s Dementia which so far had more than 11,000 view and over 1,700 likes on [...]

    Like

  63. [...] Many if not most translators are typically introverts who would rather die than embarrass themselves with an elevator speech and who would absolutely agree with Jean Paul Sartre’s quote that “l’enfer, c’est les autres” (hell is other people), as I wrote for instance in my post about translator’s dementia. [...]

    Like

  64. [...] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6YzGOq42zLk&feature=g-all-blg Translator's dementia (TD, dementia translatoris) is a relatively recent neurodegenerative disorder, believed to be caused by the en…  [...]

    Like

  65. [...] to come up with the lowest price and shortest turnaround time. This is again very efficient because most zombie translators typically check their e-mail every couple of minutes, and since they know that they are bidding against the bids of other zombies, they always bid very [...]

    Like

  66. Hi, I run a translation blog that I recently started, a friend told me about this opic and I want to ask you if can I translate into spanish and post it to my blog?
    Thank you in advance

    Like

  67. Oh, yes, please translate it into Spanish and send me a link to your blog.

    Like

  68. Thank you again. Here is the link:
    http://wp.me/p3pKnH-26

    Like

  69. […] may ultimately develop a nasty disease called “translator’s dementia” (TD). I described the symptoms of this modern disease, which is affecting more and more translators these …. I am very proud of this post because as of today, it has 1.8 k likes on Facebook and 138 tweets, […]

    Like

  70. Very interesting, but I suspect you have one cause-and-effect relationship reversed: isn’t TD a prerequisite for becoming a professional translator, rather than a result?
    And the background may be genetic; that would explain, at least how my sister, our parents, and I are all in this line of work!

    Like

  71. […] Original text published here […]

    Like

  72. […] sins or seven biblical plagues do make our life difficult, have resulted in a new disease called “translator’s dementia”, quite common among […]

    Like

  73. […] translation (CEATL 2011) When interpreters are paid the same as fast food workers, who is to blame? Translator’s Dementia (TD) – What It Is and How To Recognize the Signs Customers Want Your Sales People to be Insightful Problem Solvers 10 Amazing Translation Tools of […]

    Like

  74. […] What?!?!? Translators’ Dementia?!?!? And this is what I get from my so-called blogosphere friends? I take another sip of coffee […]

    Like

  75. […] effects of ignoring the 6-hours rule in translators’ work include, but are not limited to: translator’s dementia (TD), nausea, stomach/abdominal pain, dry mouth, headache, nervousness, dizziness, trouble sleeping, […]

    Like

  76. Excellent, I totally reconize myself in your description. I do not go out often so I’ve almost forget how it feels to be around people, and I am definitely thinking to find another job. Hope that this feeling will go away.
    Wish you all the best..

    Like

  77. […] home, connected to my WiFi router, I still check my e-mail mostly on the cell phone, (compulsive and excessive checking of e-mail is a characteristic symptom of translator’s dement…, and like most translators, I too am suffering from this dreadful […]

    Like

  78. […] Unfortunately, scientists have overlooked what could be called a side effect of this positive and highly desirable development in a bilingual or multilingual brain, namely that at the same time, bilingualism and multilingualism may cause early onset of a special kind of dementia that occurs only among translators, called translator’s dementia (TD, dementia transl… […]

    Like

  79. Reblogged this on One Sec Translation Service di Chiara Bartolozzi and commented:
    Translator’s Dementia, make up! (Bishoujo Senshi – Sailor Moon https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8Rvwu8Wykw)

    Like

  80. […] are not weightless or ephemeral. Quite a few of them are in fact overweight as a result of their sedentary occupation and a dull, monotonous and generally predictable lifestyle. Unlike angels, translators don’t know how to perform miracles (even though their clients […]

    Like

  81. […] It so happens that as I was writing this post, I received an e-mail from a translation agency (like many translators, I suffer from so-called frequent e-mail checking disorder, one of the signs of an insipid modern disease called translator’s dementia). […]

    Like


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,272 other followers

%d bloggers like this: